Doris Salcedo

I'm just starting to learn about this fascinating Colombian artist.
More here and here.















































Doris Salcedo carries out extensive research into the lives of those affected by Colombia's civil war, a conflict that has lasted intermittently since 1948. She interviews the relatives of the dead and the 'disappeared', or comes to know them through the records of humanitarian workers. In the case of the Unland sculptures she travelled to a chaotic and violent region in northern Colombia. There she met children from the area who were living in orphanages or on their own, and observed the way their lives developed over a period of time. More than the stories she was told by the children, or the words they used, Salcedo states that it is the condition of their lives which have been distorted by their experiences of loss that surfaces in the Unland sculptures.

6 comments:

Jeane said...

Hi Jen - I have lurked here for awhile but had to comment on these photos - this work just knocked me out - thanks so much for the introduction of this artist.

Jen Bradford said...

Thanks for writing! I took a peek at your blog and look forward to spending some time exploring. I was interested to see a parallel in our attention to simplifying abstract forms lately. I wonder if it's a positive side to the recession - I keep thinking in terms of the bare minimum - what is most important? What can I get rid of and be happier for it?

Marcia Miner said...

I was so blown away by this artist's work, particularly the one with the chairs that I linked your blog to my Colombian friend Pat and she wrote back an interesting comment.

"She had a solo show at the Tate Modern about a year 1/2 ago I think. In a very broad sense her work has to do with the civil war in Colombia and the displacement of the Colombian people because of it."

Jen Bradford said...

Yes, the second link is to the Tate - the quote I posted is from the Unland series. I would like to see this monograph and read more!

Mark Bradford said...

Makes me think of Nancy Rubins much differently.

Jen Bradford said...

Shoot me an email about it sometime. I had to look her up. I see the relationship, but of course the gist and tone are completely different.

I don't really know how it's possible for anyone to look at installations with multiples of objects and not think of Auschwitz. And even when people aren't talking about death, that's always what they seem to be about for me.